Message from JavaScript discussions

May 2017

— Oops im on phone if thats mobile version, haha

— 

"IDDFS is equivalent to breadth-first search, but uses much less memory; on each iteration, it visits the nodes in the search tree in the same order as depth-first search, but the cumulative order in which nodes are first visited is effectively breadth-first."

— Hmmmm

— 

{
a: {
aa: {},
ab: {},
ac: {}
b: {
ba: {},
bb: {},
bc: {}
c: {
ca: {},
cb: {},
cc: {}
}

— In what order would it enter the empty objects?

— Root, a, aa, ab, ac, b, ba, bb etc...

— It immediately traverses into any object

— Navigation is in a stack as well which means traversals can be scheduled in specific orders too

— "A depth-first search starting at A, assuming that the left edges in the shown graph are chosen before right edges, and assuming the search remembers previously-visited nodes and will not repeat them (since this is a small graph), will visit the nodes in the following order: A, B, D, F, E, C, G. The edges traversed in this search form a Trémaux tree, a structure with important applications in graph theory"

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— In that example, on first iteration, the caller would get this object:

{
tuple: {
original: {
aa: {},
ab: {},
ac: {}
},
search: {
aa: {},
ab: {},
ac: {}
}
},
loc: "aa",
existing: null,
isContainer: true,
isLast: false
}

Message permanent page

— Per iteration would look similar, but the tuple will be the object being iterated and loc will be the accessor

Message permanent page

— How is this different from depth first